the #projectinterpret journey

The #projectinterpret journey continues with exciting adventures and avid pilots of the project... the interpretation of history through objects figured high on the list! The fantastic 'India and the World' exhibition at the Chhatrapati Shivaji Maharaj Vastu Sangrahalaya (CSMVS) (formerly Prince of Wales Museum of Western India) at Mumbai has finally closed. But, with its... Continue Reading →

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#projectinterpret

  Do you want to sense your existence, dance with the colours, laugh with the ripples, design the moment and live some more? In 2018, VarnikaDesigns launches #projectinterpret - a multi sensory, cultural, interactive space that attempts to seek ways to know ourselves, appreciate our histories and our people, and interpret ourselves in this extremely... Continue Reading →

The Design Overture

  "The ability to feel, to see, to discover, to think, to build and model, communicate and to evaluate form the core of design learning..." M P Ranjan, NID, 2004 In July 2002, Suranjana Satwalekar initiated me into the blitzkrieg of Design. Bewildered and gawky, I started with thinking that when NIDians went for a... Continue Reading →

Decoding Durga Pujo

Dedicated to the girls of the 1992 Batch of Maharani Gayatri Devi Girl's Public School, Jaipur Dear Friends You have strongly motivated me to write a post on Durga, her reverance, her attributes, the 'pandals',  her relevance to Bengal and the Bengali community. I will take a valiant attempt in keeping with the spirit of... Continue Reading →

She sells sea shells…

This small watercolour by Priyam Chatterjee brings many thoughts to my overworked and undersized brain...A brain greedy for rushing colours, vibrance and images cannot stop going back to this painting and freezing...arrested with the stark painfulness of the moment captured in vivid colours. A day before India creaked with her arthitic joints towards her nearly 70th birthday... Continue Reading →

Moko Jumbie sculptures, British Museum

The British Museum has installed two 7 metre high carnival figures on stilts made by the UK-Trinidadian artist Zak Ové, they celebrate African contributions to world carnival. According to the British Museum website: The Museum commissioned these figures to coincide with London’s Notting Hill Carnival at the end of August. Moko Jumbie figures became a key feature... Continue Reading →

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